Videos

afloat (2014), by Paulo Guicheney

Afloat  was inspired by Sylvia Plath’s poem Two Views of a Cadaver Room (1960). Plath describes how two Flemish lovers in the lower right-hand corner of Pieter Bruegel’s The Triumph of Death (1562) remain enthralled in each other’s love, completely oblivious to the carnage around them and to the “death-head” playing the vielle behind them.

afloat (2014), by Paulo Guicheney

Afloat was inspired by Sylvia Plath’s poem Two Views of a Cadaver Room (1960). Plath describes how two Flemish lovers in the lower right-hand corner of Pieter Bruegel’s The Triumph of Death (1562) remain enthralled in each other’s love, completely oblivious to the carnage around them and to the “death-head” playing the vielle behind them.

Nostalgic Visions (2009), by Elainie Lillios

Nostalgic Visions was inspired by Federico García-Lorca’s Ballad of the Little Square. In this piece there is a dialogue between reality (played on the keyboard) and memory (inside the  instrument). Sections of improvisation give the performer a chance to partake not only in the music-making but in the compositional process, making the piece fresh and relevant at every performance.

Nostalgic Visions (2009), by Elainie Lillios

Nostalgic Visions was inspired by Federico García-Lorca’s Ballad of the Little Square. In this piece there is a dialogue between reality (played on the keyboard) and memory (inside the  instrument). Sections of improvisation give the performer a chance to partake not only in the music-making but in the compositional process, making the piece fresh and relevant at every performance.

(2008), by Liduino Pitombeira

(dust in English) was based on a geometric structure called Cantor Dust, developed in 1883 by the German mathematician Georg Cantor. A line is divided into three and the middle section is eliminated. This process is repeated indefinitely until the remaining sections become like dust… Pitombeira replicates this in the rhythms and intervals used, as well as in the structure of the phrases. 

(2008), by Liduino Pitombeira

 (dust in English) was based on a geometric structure called Cantor Dust, developed in 1883 by the German mathematician Georg Cantor. A line is divided into three and the middle section is eliminated. This process is repeated indefinitely until the remaining sections become like dust… Pitombeira replicates this in the rhythms and intervals used, as well as in the structure of the phrases.